Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Primula hybrid x polyantha (hybrid between Primrose and Cowslip)

 


 Studies of the hybrid x polyantha
in progress



The Flower head arrangement

Left: Primrose (P. vulgaris)
Middle: Cowslip (P. veris)
Right: Hybrid False oxlip (P. polyantha)

With the hybrid to the far right you notice it takes on from both parent species (P. vulgaris x P. veris). At the first look it has the stance of a Cowslip, but when you look closer you note the colour of the flowers are much lighter than a regular Cowslip although they are not as light a yellow as a regular Primrose. So I find it best to look at it as a in-between as maybe expected with a typical hybrid.  

Next the flower head arrangement stands out a mile as being different, again at first it gives off the Cowslip look but soon you notice the flower arrangement is different with the flowers at the end of long stems again a factor you notice with the primrose more so than a Cowslip, so again we have the in-betweener factor.

Just to clarify the difference in flower colours


Left: Primrose (P. vulgaris)
Middle: Cowslip (P. veris)
Right: Hybrid False oxlip (P. polyantha)


"A Club, A Spade and a in between"

"The leaf from above"

(Click over the photo to enlarge)

Top side of leaf
Top: Primrose (P. vulgaris)
Middle: Cowslip (P. veris)
Bottom: Hybrid False oxlip (P. polyantha)

I have called the Primrose (P. vulgaris) the Club, because of the shape of the leaf.  It is far more round at the top of the leaf than the other two which are more oval shape.  The main factor of difference for me is that the Primrose leaf lies flat and does not show ruffling to the edge as you can see is very pronounced especially within the hybrid leaf. I have noticed this ruffling with all the leaves on the main study plant. 

Click over the photo to enlarge

(above) Underside of leaf

Top: Primrose (P. vulgaris)
Middle: Cowslip (P. veris)
Bottom: False oxlip (P. polyantha)


Both top and bottom are underside leaves from the hybrid - x polyantha.
Note the "ruff" edging to the hybrid leaf, for comparison see below.


Top leaf is from the hybrid - x polyantha
Bottom leave is from Primrose (primula vulgaris)

It is very noticeable that the hybrid (top) has a ruffled edge (crinkled), whereby the regular primrose (P. vulgaris) is almost flat in comparison. 

The shape of the top of the leaf seems more rounded with the Primrose (P. vulgaris) compared to more oval in the Cowslip or the hybrid.

A really good pointer is the tapering of the lower part of the leaf on the hybrid is more gradual, and much more sharper on the primrose (P. vulgaris) 

Another way to tell is that the hairs on the underside seem to be far longer in the case of the Primrose (P. vulgaris) and far easier to capture in a photo, than the shorter bristles afforded on both the Cowslip or the hybrid itself. 

(below) Hairiness of the underside of the leaves

(Click over the photo to enlarge)

Left: Primrose (P. vulgaris)
Middle: Cowslip (P. veris)
Right: Hybrid False oxlip (P. polyantha)

The Primrose on the left seems to be much longer hairs than both the Cowslip or the hybrid.

Saturday, May 8, 2021

Gymnosporangium clavariiforme (Cedar Apple Rust fungi)

 


This is an extroadinary beautiful fungi which I first started to notice last year when I was walking through Holme Stinted Pastures, near Burton In Kendal. It seems to take over some of the more ancient Juniper trees.

Yesterday (7th May 2021) I was again in the same area actually photographing Early Purple Orchids, although sadly these had been almost demolished with all the heavy rain we have had recently.  Yet I did notice from a couple of the Junipers which were well spread out from one another that they bore the Gymnosporangium clavariiforme or the Cedar Apple Rust fungi.  I would have estimated that the fungi was one to two days old at the best and would be gone within the period of the next couple of days. It does not last long and seems to disappear without trace. 

Here are some of the photos from yesterday, I hope you enjoy.  Please let me know if you want any further details.

















Friday, April 30, 2021

Hybrid Avens - Geum. x intermedium (eg: Geum rivale x geum urbanum = Water Avens and Wood Avens)

 

This beauty is found on Slape Lane, just after the area "Bullfinch plantation" which is marked on the top bar of a fence. 

There is heavy populations of both Water (40 plus) and Wood Avens present in the nearby vicinity and you can see the Avens intermingled with the leaves of anemone to either side of the banking. 

The hybrid obviously is rarer and harder to find, but it's there and you first become aware of it's precence by its beautiful yellow petals.  The hybrid takes on more of the look of the water avens in profile, however the petals take on the colour of the Wood Avens eg: yellow.  Also if you note the petals shown in this examples also bave petal edge shape resembling the edges of the Wood Avens.  See differences from the following photos (taken on 30th April 2021)


This photo above shows the two parent species and the hybrid eg: Top photo left is the Water Avens (Geum rivale) and the Top photo right is showing the underside. The middle left photo shows the Wood Avens with the middle right showing it's underside. And finally at the bottom left you see the hybrid and to the bottom right the underside. 


This photo shows both hybrid intermediate on the left and the water Avens to the right, you can see they do have some similar build with the sepals etc, but the petals are totally different to one another, first in colour and secondly in the shape.  With the hybrid you get the yellow petal and the more rounded edge at the bottom of the petal. (photo taken on Slape Lane, Burton In Kendal on 30th April 2021)

Here below is a new photo taken on 7th May 2021 from the near Rowley Copse population which lies about 1/2 mile distant from Population 1 and it lies very much within shade of a banking with canopied trees. I have noticed here they are later in coming through by up to one week. The petals here definately tend to be on a lighter side of things and may well be an intermediate, here below now are some photos of Population 2. to be cont



This photo shows the water avens. (photo taken on Slape Lane, Burton In Kendal on 30th April 2021)


This photo shows the water avens (inside). (photo taken on Slape Lane, Burton In Kendal on 30th April 2021)


This photo shows the water avens. (photo taken on Slape Lane, Burton In Kendal on 30th April 2021)



This photo shows the rarer hybrid avens. (photo taken on Slape Lane, Burton In Kendal on 30th April 2021)


This photo shows the rarer hybrid avens with other buds awaiting opening. (photo taken on Slape Lane, Burton In Kendal on 30th April 2021)



This photo shows the rarer hybrid avens from the inside/underside. (photo taken on Slape Lane, Burton In Kendal on 30th April 2021)



This photo above shows both Avens species or at least Wood Avens and many intermediary of the hybrids.


Top: Water Avens
Middle: Wood Avens
Bottom: Hybrid intermediate (G. rivale and g.urbanum)

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Wood Forget Me Not (Myosotis sylvatica)

Wood Forget Me Not (Myosotis sylvatica) is a beautiful plant. I occasionally do find specimens in or around Hutton Roof.



Wood Forget Me Not (Myosotis sylvatica), found on Vicarage Lane, Burton In Kendal
Photo by mobile on 27th April 2021.


Wood Forget Me Not (Myosotis sylvatica), found on Vicarage Lane, Burton In Kendal
Photo by mobile on 27th April 2021.

Sunday, July 26, 2020

Inula conyzae - Ploughman's Spikenard


This is a lovely plant which I find on most of the Hutton Roof pavements.  I normally see it from around July onwards


Inula conyzae (Ploughman's spikenard)
Photo: 28th July 2010

Inula conyzae (Ploughman's spikenard)
Photo: 28th July 2010

Inula conyzae (Ploughman's spikenard)
Photo: 28th July 2010

Inula conyzae (Ploughman's spikenard)
Photo: 28th July 2010

Inula conyzae (Ploughman's spikenard)
Photo: 28th July 2010

Inula conyzae (Ploughman's spikenard)
Photo: 28th July 2010

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Stachys sylvatica - Hedge Woundwort



Stachys sylvatica - Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal



Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal


Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal


Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal


Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal


Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal


Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal


 Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal

Stachys sylvatica Hedge Woundwort
Photo: 4th June 2020 - Plain Quarry, Burton In Kendal

Thursday, May 28, 2020

Main Title Page



Click over latin title for access to species


Adoxa moschatellina (Moschatel)

Aegopodium podagraria (Ground Elder)

Ajuga reptans (Bugle)

Allium ursinum (Ramsons)

Anemone nemorosa (Wood Anemone)

Antennaria dioica (Mountain Everlasting)

Anthriscus sylvestris (Cow Parsley)

Arabis hirsuta (Hairy Rockcress)

Arenaria serpyllifolia (Thyme Leaved Sandwort)

Asperula cynanchica (Squinancywort)

Cardamine pratensis (Cuckooflower)

Carlina vulgaris (Carline Thistle)

Cerastium fontanum (Common Mouse-ear)

Chrysosplenium oppositifolium (Opposite Leaved Golden Saxifrage)

Circaea x intermedia (Upland Enchanters Nightshade)

Clematis vitalba (Travellers Joy)

Convallaria majalis (Lily of the Valley)

(Cruciata laevipes) Crosswort


Dianthus deltoides (Maiden Pink)

Daphne Mezereone (Daphne Mezereone)

Epipactis atrorubens (Dark Red Helleborine)

Epipactis helleborine (Broad Leaved Helleborine)

Erinus alpinus (Fairy Foxglove)

Galium aparine (Cleavers)


Galium boreale (Northern Bedstraw)

Galium saxatile (Heath Bedstraw)

Galium sterneri (Limestone Bedstraw)

Geranium molle (Dovesfoot Cranesbill)

Gentianella amarella (Autumn Gentian)

Gentianella campestris (Field Gentian)

Geum rivale (Water Avens)

Geum urbanum (Wood Avens)

Helianthemum nummularium (Common Rock-rose)

Hippocrepis comosa (Horseshoe Vetch)

Hyacinthoides non-scripta (Bluebell)

Hypericum hirsutum (Hairy St. John's Wort)

Hypericum montanum (Pale St. John's Wort)

Inula conyzae (Ploughman's spikenard)

Lamiastrum galeobdolan (Yellow Archangel)

Lotus corniculatus (Birds Foot Trefoil)

Lysimachia nemorum (Yellow Pimpernel)

Medicago lupulina (Black Medick

Metampyrum pratense (Common Cow-wheat)

Minuartia verna (Spring Sandwort)

Myrrhis odorata (Sweet Cicely)

Ophrys insectifera (Fly Orchid)

Orchis mascula (Early Purple Orchid)

Paris quadrifolia (Herb Paris)

Pedicularis palustrus (Marsh Lousewort)

Pilosella officinarum (Mouse-ear Hawkweed)

Plantago lanceolata (Ribwort Plantain)

Polygala serpyllifolia  (Heath Milkwort)

Polygala vulgaris (Common Milkwort)

Polygonatum odoratum (Angular Solomons Seal)

Potentilla erecta (Tormentil)

Potentilla sterilis (Barren Strawberry)

Potentilla tabernaemontani (Spring Cinquefoil)

Poterium sanguisorba (Salad Burnet)

Primula vulgaris and P.veris (Primrose and Cowslip)

Prunella vulgaris (Self Heal)

Prunus padus (Bird Cherry)

Saxifrage tridactylites (Rue Leaved Saxifrage)

Sherardia arvensis (Field Madder)

Stachys sylvatica (Hedge Woundwort)

Stellaria holostea (Greater Stitchwort)

Talictrum minus (Lesser Meadow-rue) 

Trifolium medium (Zigzag Clover)

Trifolium pratense (Red Clover)

Veronica serpyllifolia (Thyme Leaved Speedwell)

Vicia sativa (Common Vetch)

Vicia sepium (Bush Vetch)

Viola riviniana (Dog Violet)


GRASSES

Briza media (Quaking Grass)

Carex ornithopodia (Birds Foot Sedge)

Luzula campestris (Field Wood Rush)

Melica nutans (Mountain Melick)

Melica uniflora (Wood Melick)

Seslera caerulea (Blue Moor Grass)